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Congratulations, Georgia!

 

Our nurse Georgia showed her sporting merits again by competing in The Rock Triathlon on Sunday 23 February.

It’s a tough course that highlights some of the beauty of the unusual rock formation making up The Rock, and featured a pool swim and run after the bike leg.

It’s a great local event that supports the small community of The Rock and its surrounds. 

Georgia is enjoying competing in these strenuous events and puts the rest of us to shame. 

Super proud of this girl who finished in an amazing 7th place!

 

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Training

Our training night this week focused on office procedures. It’s so important to everyone, staff, patients and clients that we have the best practice and that the clinic runs smoothly for maximum efficiency.

We are focusing hard on training with Lunch and Learn’s topic this week being Patient Advocacy.

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Staff Appreciation

This week begins our new section to celebrate the big, the small and the wonderful things our staff do that often go unmentioned and unsaid. 

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Helen Foley

One of our newest staff members. She has fitted in to our team so well and so quickly. Helen is a fount of ideas and efficiency. We owe Helen for getting our Lunch and Learn sessions up and running again. 

We also appreciate her yummy cookig!

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Priscilla Willcockson

Most of our clients know our experienced surgery nurse Priscilla. Priscilla also manages our Rescue  arm. She does the most brilliant job of finding foster carers  and new homes for our abandoned and orphaned babies. 

Priscilla has also spent hours of her own tome recently putting together our online shop.

Thank you, Priscilla. A fantastic job well done!

 

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Georgia Rusconi

Georgia is our marathon champ but also our hospital champ!

Georgia has an amazing attention to detail working with her hospital patients. 

We love how much you care about your patients. Thank you, Georgia!

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Adoptions

Left: We have Nemo, a gorgeous 8 week old male hand raised boy 😊

 

Right: And Maxx; a 14 week old domestic medium hair male who is very cuddly

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Microchipping

A microchip is a permanent form of pet identification that is inserted under the skin.

Overview

In most States, microchipping is a legal requirement. Each microchip has a unique, electronic identification number that can be detected by a scanner. It is the size of a rice grain and is implanted under the skin between the shoulder blades of your pet’s back.

A microchip is a permanent form of pet identification unlike the tag and/or collar that can become lost or damaged. It’s a good idea for your pet to have a microchip, collar and I.D. tag.

Microchip procedure

The microchipping procedure is very quick and safe. As with all needles, it may cause some discomfort but it is shortlived. It is not a surgical procedure and it does not require general anesthesia.

It is recommended that the pet is microchipped prior to purchase or adoption. If your pet has not been microchipped, your veterinarian, local council or animal welfare organization will be able to perform the procedure. Only authorized microchip implanters are permitted to perform the procedure.

Microchip registry database

Your contact details are kept on a microchip registry database so that if your pet is lost, you can be contacted. It is very important that you notify the registry if your contact details change or if ownership should change.

Current microchip registry database:

  1. Australasian Animal Registry
  2. Central Animal Records
  3. HomeSafeID
  4. NSW Companion Animal Registry
  5. Petsafe
  6. Pet Register

If you are unsure where your pet was microchipped and you need to contact them, have your pet scanned and check the microchip number on the Petaddress website.

Microchip side effects

Microchip side effects are very rare. The most common reaction is the movement of the microchip from the original implantation site. Other problems include hair loss, infection, and swelling on extremely rare occasions.

Microchip failure

Although very rare, microchips can be undetected when the pet is scanned.

Commons causes of undetected microchips:

  • There is no microchip
  • Microchip failure
  • Scanner failure
  • Improper scanning technique
  • Pet-related factors such as not sitting still to be scanned, matted hair, fat deposits, metal collar

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