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Lake Road Vet Staff Christmas Party

Last Saturday night we gathered as a staff to celebrate the end of the year with our annual Christmas Party and Awards Ceremony.

We had a fun night at the International Hotel. It was an opportunity for partners to join the staff and for the various teams to mingle. A few little ones even joined the fun. 

Awards are handed out for outstanding categories, service and fun categories. Management made sure everyone took home plenty of goodies and so did Santa (Secret). All in all we had a great night!

Enjoy the photos!

 

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Dr Alex and her Grand Theft Otter Award!

Right- ‘Santa’ and her Elves!

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Last year’s Jim Dorling Memorial Award Winner, Dr Georgia Ladmore (now Powell), handing the award to this year’s winnner, Dr Shayne Ault.

Birthdays

Happy birthday to one of our newer staff members, Kaitlyn. Kaitlyn’s celebrated her birthday on her first day at Lake Rd.

We hope you had a great first day, Kaitlyn, and a fantastic birthday!

Happy birthday, Kaitlyn!

 

 

Brooke’s birthday was a couple of week’s ago and we finally caught up with both her cake and the photo of it!

Brooke was super lucky to get a yummy and cold ice cream cake in this hot weather! 

Happy birthday, Brooke!

 

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Montanna preparing to fax her final assignment! She will then be a qualified veterinary nurse. 

Congratulations, Montanna!

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Alex showing trainee Nurse Joella how to do dental x-rays.

Welcome

This week we welcome new staff members Max, Abby, Emma, Kate, Ella and Kaitlyn to the Lake Rd Vet Family.

You will see these new members around the clinic in various roles.

We hope they enjoy working with us and being part of our team.

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Summer

Summer has hit quite suddenly this year and very early. We are in for a long hot summer, unfortunately, this year. We need to take extra care with our pets in the heat and throughout the summer the clinic will see too many precious furbabies suffering from heatstroke. Below is an article from the Australian Veterinarian Association with some good tips on how to avoid your pets suffering through the summer.

 

Keeping Your Pet Cool This Summer

There are simple tips that can help to prevent or minimise problems in pets who are just as susceptible to heat-related illness as humans.

Unlike people, who sweat through the skin, pets, such as cats and dogs, cool off through the pads of their feet and tongues. They need to pant to regulate their temperature, and dogs and cats with long hair can be more susceptible to the effects of heat.

Here are some top tips for dogs and cats to beat the heat.

Water and ice

  • Make sure there is plenty of cool, fresh water available at all times. Have multiple bowls and make sure they are changed regularly and in shady areas.
  • One way to provide relief from the heat is to fill the kids’ paddling pool with a couple of inches of water and leave this in a shady spot for your dog to sit in.
  • Tossing a few ice cubes in your dog or cat’s water bowl can help to keep their temperature down and provide some relief on a hot day.
  • Consider putting some treats in the freezer. These can be given to your pet as a pet popsicle on really hot days. They’ll help cool your pet down and give them something to do when you’re out.

Shade

  • Make sure your pets have multiple shady areas to go to over the day.
  • Dogs love to sit in the sun, but prolonged sun exposure can quickly lead to heat exhaustion and can cause skin cancers so it’s important to provide them with a shaded area.

Special needs

  • Our senior pets can tend to struggle more with the heat, particularly if they have mobility and breathing problems, so we need to keep an extra eye on them.
  • If you own a longhaired dog, consider giving them a trim to help them cope better with the hotter summer months.
  • Dogs with flat faces are especially prone to overheating as their flat faces interfere with their ability to cool themselves. 

Take it easy

  • Hot days are good days to stay quiet at home. Avoid exercise in the hottest part of the day, and if you do go for a walk, do so when the temperature is much lower in the very early morning or late evening.
  • If you have air-conditioning or fans, often our pets are most comfortable inside with us in the height of summer.

Danger signs

Signs of heat stroke include heavy panting, difficulty breathing, fatigue, drooling, vomiting, diarrhoea and even seizures. 

It’s important to take your pet to your local veterinarian if they are displaying any signs of heat stroke. And it goes without saying that you really must never leave a pet unattended in a car, even when the weather isn’t very hot.

 

Article thanks to the Australian Veterinarian Association

 

 

 

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